WHO SAYS KIRRA DOESN'T BREAK ANYMORE?

Friday September 23, 2011

In the small town of Coolangatta on the Gold Coast of Australia's beautiful wave rich eastern edge, there was a wave called Kirra. She still exists but her face has changed forever due to a combination of erosion and beach nourishment programs during the last few decades. Now don't get me wrong, she is still beautiful, but back in her prime, she was a perfect 10 with unbelievable shape and form, endlessly peeling across the sand bank. Today the wave is a bit shorter and not as ruler edged, but can still give you the tube of your life. With the strong currents and sand pumping, Kirra's waves are ever-changing and unpredictable, but on the right angle swell and tide there are some epic waves if you can keep your position in the lineup.

http://s3.amazonaws.com/true-ames-20110412/assets/uploads/4318/original/kirra-small.jpg?1316818574 Here is a shot from last year during an off season swell. This wave is seriously breaking in about a foot and a half of water with super fast sections and a current that will make your arms sore. In the moment ( an unidentified Kirra local gettin' shacked )

to download this image as a wallpaper for your desktop check out the wallpaper page here.

* Prior to 1840 — Kirra is not known by its current name and is rarely visited by white settlers.
* 1840-1910 — The first white holiday-makers start to visit.
* 1910-1920 — Holiday-makers increase, making Kirra a popular recreational beach area.
* 1930s — The opening of the South coast road increases the popularity of the southern Gold Coast as a holiday destination. Camping was very popular for families because Kirra had a long beach and a low-lying dune system.
* 1960-early 1974 — The Tweed River breakwaters combine with a series of low-pressure weather systems to result in serious sand erosion. This brings the high-water level to just below the coastal road.
* 1970s — Big Groyne built at Kirra's south end.
* 1995 — 30 metres taken off Big Groyne to help fight erosion at Greenmount Beach.
* 2001 — Start of Tweed River sand bypass project.
* 2003 — Little Groyne completely buried in sand.
* 2006 — Project launched by Griffith University Coastal Management Center to restore the beach

Read More


Subscribe via RSSSubscribe via RSS

site by: Citrus Media Group